Tag

formerly incarcerated

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A sign saying "Closed" hands in a window that reflects treetops and the sky. The interior of the building is dark.

PHAs Could House People with Convictions, But Most Don’t

Policy changes by local public housing authorities can be transformative for Americans with convictions, and for their families.

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COVID

Pandemic Leads to Early Prisoner Release, But Finding Housing for Them Remains Difficult

As the infection rate at jails in places like New York began to climb, officials started looking for criteria to use in determining which inmates could be released. Then they ran into a familiar but now heightened dilemma.

A woman wearing a white shirt and pants smiles outside as she listens to music from her headphones.
Arts & Culture

New Visions of Justice Through the Camera Lens

An experimental learning opportunity allows formerly incarcerated individuals to use photography to explore ideas of freedom, complex relationships, and their personal experience with the criminal justice system.

CDFIs

Making Loans to Help Formerly Incarcerated People Get Back on Their Feet

CDFIs and nonprofits are figuring out how to help formerly incarcerated people build credit histories and access capital in order to get their lives going.

Housing

A Fair Chance at Housing For Those With Records

If you have an arrest or conviction record, you’ll most likely have a difficult time finding a place to rent. A new law in Cook County aims to protect potential tenants from housing discrimination.

Arts & Culture

Art that Amplifies the Stories of Formerly Incarcerated People

Art that highlights the effects of long-term sentencing and the need to support and expand services for those who are reentering society.

Policy

Reaching Out to Voters in the Justice System

Many people lose their right to vote while incarcerated and don’t regain it after their sentences are over. There are many more people involved in the justice system who can vote but don’t know it. Communities could increase their political power if they could reach these voters.

Editor’s Note

Bringing Justice Home

Chances are high that community developers are working in areas and with populations that are being strongly affected by overpolicing and hyper-incarceration. In this issue we take a look at that intersection.

Housing

A Home After Prison: There’s No Place Like Homecoming

Formerly incarcerated people are nearly 10 times more likely to be homeless than the general public. The Homecoming Project imatches those returning home with a community host for six months.

A once-vacant lot in Philadelphia that has been cleaned.
Health

Greening Vacant Lots: Low Cost, Big Effect in Philly

A Philadelphia program is cleaning up abandoned lots, helping formerly incarcerated residents get jobs, and improving the overall health and well-being of neighborhoods.

A man stands outside his home in New Orleans
Housing

Housing Authority Eliminates Ban of Ex-Offenders

With the approval of new background check procedures, a criminal conviction won’t automatically disqualify a person from receiving public housing or voucher assistance in New Orleans.

HUD Secretary Julian Castro poses in a formal headshot in front of an American flag.
Interview

Interview with HUD Secretary Julian Castro

Shelterforce got a chance to speak with Secretary Julian Castro about some of the current ways in which he’s working to make HUD a force for good in people’s lives, and what steps there are left to be taken.

Fair Housing

Where are people returning to the community from prison supposed to live?

The United States is incarceration happy. Our incarceration rate is five times as high as comparable countries, and has been the highest in the world since 2002. This means a […]