A composite of four people who are speaking. At top left, a person with a beard and red top, at top right, a person with a red shirt sits in front of a black background; bottom left, a man with a blue shirt sits on a recliner, and at bottom right, a woman with glasses.

UNDER THE LENS: A closer look with shelterforce

What Makes Our Homes Accessible?

Four disability activists tell us what they needed to make their homes accessible, and how difficult it can be to find accessible housing.

Under the Lens

Not Just Ramps—Disability and Housing Justice

Disability and housing intersect in many ways. What comes to mind for most people is physical accessibility, but accessibility is not always a matter of physical spaces. A wide range of policies, rules, and procedures can also have accessibility implications, often unintended. Over the next several months in our new Under the Lens series, Not Just Ramps—Disability and Housing Justice, we'll delve into some of the different laws that are supposed to require accessible spaces and reduce discrimination, as well as the tactics and resources housing developers can use to prioritize making disability-friendly housing. Don't miss a story—sign up for our newsletter today.

Accessibility is more than a ramp to the front door. In this video, Shelterforce speaks with four disability activists about what they needed to make their homes accessible, and how difficult it can be to find accessible housing. (Note: What an accessible home means varies a lot from person to person, and this video only represents a small slice.)

For more, including discussions of accessibility for people with cognitive and intellectual disabilities and multiple chemical sensitivities, see Shelterforce’s series, Not Just Ramps: Disability and Housing Justice.

Video by Hudson North Productions

Other Articles in this Series

Not Just Ramps—Disability and Housing Justice