VideoHousing

Redefining “Workforce Housing”

How do we work toward providing dignified housing to everyone, regardless of their income?

According to Urban Land Institute, “workforce housing” is defined as housing for people making 60 to 120 percent of area median income—meant to be for teachers, first responders, nurses. It is being specifically contrasted to “standard” affordable housing. However, the connotation of “workforce housing” can be considered insulting, as the low-wage workforce (earning less than 60 percent of the area’s median incomes) does not qualify for workforce housing but is still a critical part the workforce making valuable contributions to society.

How do we define these various classes of housing? How do we work toward providing dignified housing to everyone, regardless of their income? The Housing Innovation Collaborative hosts a conversation with Shelterforce’s Miriam Axel-Lute on her perspectives.

Related Articles

  • Illustration of a right hand holding a small red two-dimensional house between thumb and index finger. The hand is dark blue and the arm, shown a bit beyond the wrist, is wearing a white shirt and suit jacket. The background of the image is a city skyline, in lighter shades of the same blue, with puffy clouds above.

    Ownership Matters: Institutional Investors and Corporate Ownership

    May 23, 2024

    Who owns our homes is an absolutely essential part of housing policy, and an even greater part of housing politics.

  • A Black woman in blue flowered dress and dusty pink hijab speaks into several microphones. In foreground, blurry, are news cameras. The woman is part of a large group at a rally, carrying signs promoting rent stabilization and saying "Home to Stay MPLS"

    Affordable Housing Sector Split on Rent Control

    May 21, 2024

    In the Twin Cities, where voters have recently supported rent control, most nonprofit housing developers have stayed silent, and some have openly lined up with the developers and landlords who oppose it.

  • Seven people wearing jackets and caps on a city sidewalk holding signs that say "Listen to UREB," "Save Our Homes," "Negotiate with UREB," or "5,000 Against Displacement." One person is speaking into a microphone. At the curb by the speaker is a van with WRLC painted on the side, for Western Reserve Land Conservancy.

    Nonprofit to Close Mobile Home Community to Build a Park

    May 10, 2024

    Ohio’s largest conservation land trust has been accused of purchasing a manufactured housing community with the very intention of closing it, evicting more than 100 households in the process. But proponents of the park’s closure say the land's failing infrastructure—and the benefit the property will bring to an entire city—is what forced the decision.