Organizing

Why Has Palin Cooled Toward ARDOR?

Let’s take a closer look at GOP vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin’s record on community organizing. It seems, as I said in my previous Rooflines post, that she was for […]

Let’s take a closer look at GOP vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin’s record on community organizing.

It seems, as I said in my previous Rooflines post,
that she was for community organizing before she was against it.

From the State of Alaska Commerce Department’s Web site, more information about ARDOR, the program in which Palin participated as mayor of Wasilla:

The ARDOR program is based on the notion that locally driven initiatives, in partnership with the State, can most effectively stimulate economic development and produce healthy, sustainable local economies.

The ARDORs are intended to:

  • enable communities to pool their limited resources, and work together on economic development issues;
  • develop partnerships among public, private and other organizations,
  • offer a technical, nonpartisan capacity to develop and implement an economic development strategy,
  • often have extensive experience with federal/State programs, and
  • provide needed technical assistance via direct links with local citizens.

The Republican convention’s speechwriters obviously didn’t do any more vetting of Palin’s background than the McCain campaign did. After all, they fed her a punchline put-down of organizing, despite her past support for the work.

And she spewed it dutifully, ever faithful to the “mission” she’s accepted from McCain’s campaign.

Will someone in the campaign press corps PLEASE press the McCain/Palin handlers on this bit of newspeak?

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