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The Case for Letting Developers Pay Not Build

The question of integrating affordable housing units required by inclusionary zoning on-site versus allowing developers to pay a fee to locate them off-site has long been a contentious one.

A New Kind of Redlining: Punishing Success

During the worst years of the Great American Mortgage Meltdown, shared equity homes represented an island of stability in a...

Socially-Blind Urban Planning

The contrast between prosperity and poverty is most dramatic in the harshness of inclement weather. In San Diego this...

A Case of Construction Eviction in Queens

How tenant and rent protections failed the residents of eight rent-stabilized buildings in Queens.

Inclusionary Zoning: National Context and Impact

Inclusionary zoning (IZ) requires that a percentage of housing units in new residential developments be rented or sold for prices that are affordable to...

Housing Equity’s Future: Moving from Debate to Productive Dialogue

A robust debate erupted on Shelterforce in response to Miriam Axel-Lute’s article, “The Dangerous Rhetoric of Escaping to Opportunity,” with strongly worded opinions flowing from both sides of the mobility and place based debate. As practitioners who were involved in this vigorous conversation and referenced in the article, we had a series of private discussions […]

Densifying Suburbs Is the Better Path to Housing Affordability

Alan Mallach responds to critiques of his assessment of urban versus suburban upzoning.

New York City Becomes a Hotbed of Community Land Trust Innovation

New York seems poised to move the concept of community land trusts in new and exciting directions.

It Doesn’t Matter if Your Neighborhood Is Going to Eventually Gentrify

“We could use some gentrification here.” Let's never say this—we must refrain from debating the long-term likelihood of gentrification in distressed places.

5 Ways to Create Equitable Communities Near Transit

Across the country, regions are working to improve and integrate processes to create livable communities where all residents can affordably access housing, jobs, healthcare,...

Looking to Alternative Markets for Housing, Jobs, and Assets

As public resources, grants, and publicly owned lands dwindle, community developers have had to seek out new approaches to continue their work.

Thinking Collectively

In Boston, labor and community groups are using their shared values to collaborate and win victories

Magner v. Gallagher and Fair Housing in the 21st Century

Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court decided to hear a little-known case with profound implications for our nation’s progress toward equal opportunity for all....

Leveling the Playing Field for Tenants Facing Eviction

New York City renters who face eviction could get a little more help on their side if a proposed initiative is given the green...

The Effects of NIMBY and How to Overcome Them

This is Part 4 in a series on NIMBY and affordable housing. To catch up on the rest of the series, read Part 1,...

4 Ways a President Clinton Could Help Cities Thrive in Her...

This post is part of a Shelterforce series called Letters to the Next President. ...

Season of Change

At the apex of the civil rights and social justice movements, a new type of organization, the community development corporation (CDC), was created. CDCs...

Remaking HUD

Shaun Donovan, President-elect Barack Obama’s pick to head HUD, appears to be an indication that this could be the urban policy president we’ve been...

1975 Was a Good Year

We're not the only 36-year-old in town. Here is a small sampling of other 36th birthdays taking place this year:

Urban Neglect: George W. Bush and the Cities

On April 29, 2002, the tenth anniversary of the now infamous Los Angeles riots, George W. Bush spoke at a church-sponsored community development center...