The fifth installment of Shelterforce's Health and Community Development supplement.

Spring 2019 — Health and Community Development Supplement

In our fifth installment, we take a look at how organizations are taking health care investments in housing to the next level, and how cities can weather the effects of climate change by going beyond infrastructure to address institutional racism, historical inequities, and access to physical and mental health services.

From Sustainability to Resilience

My first reaction to the emergence of “resilience” as a lens for viewing community development was mostly informed by skepticism.

A child stands in front of a sign that reads "Low Water Landscape." Photo by 100 Resilient Cities

Resilience 101

Community development fits well within the growing resilience movement—and connecting the two more explicitly could make their work even more powerful.

Disaster Aid Perpetuates Inequality

After natural disasters, recovery efforts tend to lift up those who have resources to bounce back quickly, but cement poverty for those with modest means.

Flooding in North Charleston, South Carolina

The Uncertain Flood Zone

Communities need accurate maps and more access to data to increase flood resilience—but right now FEMA’s not providing that.

Several groups gather at the Bayou Bienvenue to rid the area of water hyacinths. Joint efforts like this help build neighborhood resilience.

NOLA Brings a Holistic Focus to Resilience

Cities cannot weather the effects of climate change without going beyond infrastructure to address institutional racism, historical inequities, and access to physical and mental health services.

Parks can be a key component of building resilience. Two women walk adjacent to Buffalo Bayou Park in downtown Houston, Texas.

Designing for Climate Change

How can affordable housing be more resilient to extreme weather and better prepared to deal with the consequences of climate change?