Brandon Duong

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Brandon Duong is an associate editor for Shelterforce. He received a master's degree from the Urban Planning & Policy program at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

The Sound of Music City: Orange, NJ

Music naturally brings people together. In Orange, New Jersey, organizers show how “creative placekeeping” finds its strength in the relationships that are formed within the community.

What’s an Accessory Dwelling Unit?

The cost of housing has skyrocketed across the United States. As a response, some states and localities have legalized accessory dwelling units in hopes of expanding the supply of affordable housing. But what are ADUs?

What Can Be Done When LIHTC Affordability Restrictions Expire?

The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit program has helped create more than 3 million affordable units across the country. But if something isn’t done soon, thousands of those homes could be lost forever as affordability periods expire.
Screenshot from game of a young Black woman holding a glowing key

Dot’s Home, a Computer Game, Addresses History of Housing Discrimination

A new video game aims to educate players on the various housing barriers facing Black Americans through history. How well does it do that?

The Role Student Debt Plays in the Racial Wealth Gap

What explains the large disparity in Black and white student debt, and what can we do to address the student debt crisis and close the racial wealth gap?

Afghan Refugees Face an American Housing Crisis

Resettlement agencies have been racing to house tens of thousands of Afghan refugees in communities across the U.S., but high housing costs and a shortage of available units is making it more difficult than ever.
Two older woman talk at a table, as part of a busy outreach event.

From an Abandoned Mall to Bustling Community Hub

A medical complex in Mississippi draws on local artists to go beyond doctors' offices and become a gathering place for those living nearby.
Three audience members doing an activity on a table, while an actress stands up on stage behind them.

Shifting the Affordable Housing Narrative Through Arts and Culture

Housing activists want to use this political moment to shift long-standing narratives surrounding housing. From film to theater, here are some arts strategies that might work.

The Racial Reckoning in Public Spaces

Following George Floyd’s murder in 2020, there was an explosion of anti-racist street art across the country. “When we allow ourselves to release our emotions, oftentimes what is produced out of that is art.”

Landlords Don’t Have to Control Security Deposits

The UK saw a dramatic change in landlord behavior once security deposits were put into the hands of a third party.

Gentrification: Is Pop Culture Getting It Right?

Gentefied. In the Heights. Vida. How do storylines and portrayals of gentrification in cinema stack up to how it plays out in real life?

Atlanta Land Trust—From Central Server to a Centralized CLT

If at first you don’t succeed, partner with a land bank.

Continuing the Legacy: Keeping Longtime Residents in Their Communities

Legacy residents often have deep social ties in their communities, and when they move, it can often weaken the fabric of the neighborhood. How is one Baltimore housing provider keeping these longtime residents in their respective communities?
Atlanta's BeltLine bike path bordered by new homes.

Affordable BeltLine Project Still in Progress in Atlanta

It was a decade ago when the Atlanta BeltLine partnership set a goal of creating almost 6,000 units of affordable housing, as well as a collaborative of land trusts. What’s happened since? Did the partnership achieve its intended goals?

The Dark Side of Community Preference Policies

Community preference policies give existing residents first dibs on subsidized housing built in their neighborhoods. But what happens when these policies are applied to communities that are exclusive, well-off, and majority white?
dilapidated home's front entrance

The Work Continues: Property Maintenance Lawsuits Move Forward, Foster Care Vouchers Pass, and More

In the third installment of Shelterforce articles of old, we look back at what’s been happening with lawsuits against banks that allegedly failed to maintain properties they own in predominantly Black and Latinx neighborhoods, Medicaid money for housing, community developers elected to office, and vouchers for foster care youth.

Despite a Rocky Start, Cleveland Model for Worker Co-ops Stands Test of Time

Even during tough times, the Evergreen Cooperative Initiative has added new co-ops, new workers, and new strategies.
A city scene in Newark New Jersey.

Looking Back: Democratic Philanthropy, Newark on the Rise, the Surplus Land Campaign, and More

In this first installment of updates to Shelterforce articles of old, we find that market dynamics are different in many places we’ve written about, but many of the organizations fighting the good fight are continuing to do so, even in changed times.

Fixing the Harms of Our Eviction System: An Interview with Emily Benfer

Emily Benfer talks about what needs to change in our housing and eviction systems—not just now, but once the pandemic is past, the connections between health and housing, and how she came to be a go-to voice on the eviction crisis.
A teddy bear sits among discarded furniture on the side of the street

What You Need to Know About the Eviction Crisis

As Congress debates the details of a stimulus deal, we're giving you a roundup of the eviction crisis as well as the details of what COVID relief could be included in the package.

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