Policy

Housing, Transportation, and Workforce Development: A Coordinated Attack

The Center for Housing Policy and the Metropolitan Planning Council released a pair of policy briefs this week that promote improved coordination as related to housing, transportation, and workforce policies. […]

The Center for Housing Policy and the Metropolitan Planning Council released a pair of policy briefs this week that promote improved coordination as related to housing, transportation, and workforce policies.

The briefs represent the work done in a series of “listening sessions” in Atlanta and Minneapolis-St. Paul in spring 2009 “to explore regional perspectives on the coordination of housing, transportation and workforce policies,” according to NHC’s Open House blog.

While the foreclosure crisis has dominated the attention of housing policy practitioners and policymakers during much of 2008 and 2009, these briefs look to the future to address other current and looming housing challenges that are critical to the long-term success and sustainability of many communities nationwide.

The first brief, How Transportation Reform Could Increase the Availability of Housing Affordable to Families with a Mix of Incomes Near Public Transit, Job Centers, and Other Essential Destinations looks at how the reauthorization of the federal transportation bill help to improve coordination of transportation, housing, and land use policy. The second brief, Regional Coordination in Atlanta Metro and in the Twin Cities: Understanding the Challenges and Opportunities of Coordinating Housing, Transportation and Workforce Policies looks at existing coordinated efforts related to land-use, transportation, and workforce policy.

Shelterforce, in its fall/winter 2009 issue, took a look at Twin Cities collaborations and how government, CBOs, foundations, and CDCs are making a combined effort to address neighborhood stabilization.

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